October 25, 2009

Easy Onion Soup in Photos

Posted in Soups & Stews tagged , , at 1:18 pm by jenniec00ks

frenchonionsoup 014Phew. This took much longer than I thought, so I wouldn’t recommend this for a weeknight. It goes slowly, so I could watch some Texas football at the same time. I’m not claiming this to be terribly authentic, as it’s just a mish-mash of different french onion soup recipes that I’ve seen. It looks to be about 3 servings, and this soup is a LOT more filling than I thought.







Ingredients:

4 medium sweet yellow onions
1/2 tsp dried thyme
3/4 cup sherry
4 cups beef stock
4 tbsp butter
French bread + gruyere cheese if you want to be fancy, I used garlic/cheesy frozen texas toast.

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So peel the onion (the steps before Step 1) and cut it into thin slices.  I chopped it just like in Step 1, but I went all the way through to make half-moon shaped slices.  Then melt the butter over low heat and add the onions.  It’ll look like a lot, but lemme tell you, these things cook down like nobody’s business.

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I added the several dashes of dried thyme, roughly 1/2 tsp, and just kept the onions moving.  It took at least 30 minutes before I saw some color and added the 3/4 cup of sherry. If you want a strong sherry flavor to it, add it when the onions are golden, close to browning. By the time my onions got browned, all of the sherry had been cooked off. So after this, it took about 20 more minutes to get them browned, and once they become golden, it’s a fast track to brown, so that’s when you really need to watch them.

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Above on the left are the onions very close to golden, I didn’t get a picture of when they were brown because once they begin to brown, they move super fast.  Once they’re brown, add the 4 cups of beef stock.  Above on the right are the beef stock & sherry brands that I used, the Kitchen Basics stock was slightly stronger in flavor than the traditional broth. Since it was less than 50 cents more expensive than the Swanson beef broth, I decided to go with it.

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On the left is right after I’ve added the broth. Turn the heat up to help it come to a boil, then turn the heat back down to keep it at a simmer. After it’s simmered for about 30 minutes, it should look like the right side and be a bit thicker.  French onion soup recipes ask you to load the soup into oven proof bowls, top with the french bread and cheese, and then broil.  Since I lack the oven proof bowls, I just baked some cheesy/garlic flavored texas toast (frozen bread aisle) according to the box, and popped it on top!  Et voila!

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Yummmmm

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August 13, 2009

Basics: Dicing an onion

Posted in Basic Techniques tagged at 9:00 pm by jenniec00ks

prep-010Cut off the top and bottom of the onion.prep-011Make a shallow cut down the side.prep-013Peel the papery layer off the onion. If the layer underneath doesn’t look so good, then you can pull that too, but it’s not necessary.prep-016

Cut the onion in half and lets start dicing! We’re going to make several cuts in 3 different directions.prep-017Step 1. Leave the onion connected at the end farthest from the knife (the part where my fingers are holding the onion)prep-021Another view of the onion after step 1.prep-022Step 2. The cuts are horizontal, with the knife parallel to the cutting board. Keep your fingers out the way by pressing down on the top of onion.prep-030Finally, make the third cut and you’ve got nicely sized pieces 🙂prep-032Since they’re still connected at the edge, I give that extra piece a rough chop; holding the tip of the knife steady.